Delicious Coffee Creations from the Second Row: Ristretto, Lungo, Americano and Schümli

Delicious Coffee Creations from the Second Row: Ristretto, Lungo, Americano and Schümli

Always only cappuccino, latte macchiato & Co? The many pure coffee delicacies also deserve your attention at least as much. We present some coffee creations from the second row, all of which whet the appetite for pure coffee enjoyment.

What does the coffee lover understand by a “ristretto”?

As the “little sister” of espresso , this drink is a “shortened” version. The ristretto is prepared with the same amount of coffee powder, but only with half as much water. This variant, which uses around 15 to 25 ml of water, is even more flavorful and a little stronger than espresso. Due to the short contact time, however, fewer bitter substances are released. The result? You get an extremely aromatic taste experience and full-bodied coffee enjoyment that is not too intense.

The secret of the “Lungo”

The lungo is an Italian espresso variant in which a normal espresso is extracted with twice the amount of water. The classic lungo is prepared with around 100 ml of water and 5 to 10 g of coffee powder.

Another coffee variant – the Cafe Americano

This is a type of coffee that comes from America… is it? No, only the name seems to indicate its origin, because this variant comes from “Bella Italia” and is a “stretched” espresso, i.e. an espresso with a higher water content and without milk. The triumphant advance of this coffee specialty had its origins in World War II, when the American military became enthusiastic about Italian coffee. However, the drink was a little too strong for them. So they simply added water to neutralize the bitter substances. The Italians took this idea into their coffee and beverage range. In this way, the Cafe Americano was “born”.

At this point you will surely ask yourself what is the difference between the Lungo and the Cafe Americano. Well, the ingredients are the same. However, with the Lungo, the hot water of the fully automatic coffee machine is pressed through the brewing group and through the portafilter, so that the Lungo has a longer extraction process. Therefore, a variant is created with a different, somewhat stronger character than is the case with Cafe Americano.

Schümli coffee – or the real Swiss?

Schümli, in Swiss dialect, means nothing more than “little foam”. The Swiss use this to describe the crema that is created when coffee is prepared in a fully automatic coffee machine. A light espresso roast, a Swiss “Schümli mixture”, is used for the coffee creation. It is brewed with around 120 ml of water for a brewing time of 15 seconds using 7 to 8 grams of coffee powder.

These blends were developed in Switzerland, as the use of fully automatic coffee machines has been common here for a long time. For example, Swiss coffee roasters created coffee blends that cope well with the high pressure during brewing and the high temperatures of the fully automatic coffee machine. The characteristic of the special Swiss Schümli mixtures is the restrained acidity and the low proportion of bitter substances. This is due on the one hand to the special recipe of the green coffee, on the other hand to the traditional drum roasting. During this process, the green coffee is slowly roasted gently at low temperatures.

You might be interested in:

PREPARE LUNGO – STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS – LUNGO RECIPE

PREPARE RISTRETTO – RISTRETTO RECIPE

PREPARE ESPRESSO WITH PORTAFILTER | 8 STEPS TO THE PERFECT ESPRESSO | HELPFUL TIPS & TRICKS

PREPARE CAPPUCCINO | STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS | CAPPUCCINO RECIPE | TIPS AND TRICKS

The Swiss hardly know the term “Schümli coffee”

Interestingly, the Swiss are not familiar with this term. It is reasonable to assume that a German marketing agency came up with the term. In Switzerland, coffees for fully automatic coffee machines are called “Kafi Crème” (pronounced: Kaffi Cräm) and are served with sugar and coffee cream. So when you order a coffee in Switzerland, you get a Kafi Crème, a coffee from a fully automatic coffee machine. And so you can find it on the drinks menu of every Swiss restaurant.

When it comes to coffeeSwitzerland is divided into three parts : while the German- Swiss part is home to kafi crème drinkers, the French-speaking Swiss prefer darker roasts and espresso, which is also the most popular in Ticino. In general, the further south you go, the darker the coffee will be!